Charles P. Eisenmann – “Educate Your Dog by the Eisenmann Method”

The Sleeve:
105_5250 105_5251

The Liner/Sleeve Notes:
Charles P. Eisenmann, world renowned dog educator, who through his frequent personal appearances on the Mike Douglas. Johnny Carson and Merv Griffin shows, to name a few, has become know to millions of tv viewers as “Chuck.”
 Probably the most remarkable family in California today are the Eisenmanns, Chuck and his five “boys”: London, Hobo, Thorn, Lance and Toro. When not on the road in personal appearances, or not filming motion pictures or television, they live and romp in a sprawling ranch-style home on several acres of woodland in Thousand Oaks, California.
 Chuck, a former major league baseball pitcher, bought his first dog in 1946. Since that time, he has become totally immersed in the education of dogs. His first dog, London I, was featured in two full length motion pictures and the present London, one of his sons, gained international reknown in the title role of the television series, “The Littlest Hobo.”
 About the accomplishments of his “boys,” Chuck observes, “Man has locked the dog into a mental kindergarten by assuming he’s nothing more than a furry robot activated solely by reward and punishment conditioned reflexes. With my method, I have defied and disproven the time-worn dogmas of animal psychology by breaking my dos out of that confusing kindergarten.” Chuck detests the error-riddled obsolescence of most dog training books and insists that the “Eisenmann Method” does not ‘train’ but ‘educates’ you and your dog.
 Chuck welcomes any opportunity to discuss his method with psychology professors and students and every ‘just plain dog owner’ he meets.

Personal Review:
 It’s not often I review spoken word LPs and if I do, they’re usually religious sermons, but once in awhile comes a record that has dogs on the cover, and I feel the urge to write about it.

 Well, the album opens with Charles (or Chuck) talking about how everything you know about training dogs and forgetting how to train your dogs by the books, and my God, Chuck talks fast. He is talking about how people don’t know dogs, but that they know to train them for shows and stuff. He’s introducing the 10 steps to properly teaching your dog. Step 1: “Learn to Observe Your Dog as He Observes You. Never Overlook a Single Glance or Movement” and I’m having the hardest time following along to this, but the dog gets information from your bodily movements, and stuff, oh my God, this is confusing as heck. But equally as cool. Huh. I wish I was able to keep up with his speed of talking. Haha, “dope investigators” – that got me. Step 2: “Always Be Positive When Judging the Reasons for Your Dog’s Actions” – being wrong can set back dog training a month to a lifetime, and you should be half right when correcting your dogs actions. And know why you are wrong or right. A wagging tail doesn’t mean happiness. Spaying and neutering doesn’t fix your dog from wandering off, Chuck’s dogs aren’t neutered. Step 3: “Learn How to Use Mental Instead of Physical Approaches to Both Training and Punishing Your Dog” never hit a dog with a newspaper, or raise your voice or arm – well, I’m sure every knows that. Apparently a lot of people don’t know this (as we all know today.) – dogs don’t actually bite intentionally. Dogs apparently get embarrassed by biting it’s owners or people, but since they can’t talk, they can’t apologize. To properly punish a dog, you must hold them by the head, on the loose skin below their ears and talk to them for fifteen minutes. Step 4: “Gain Control of Your Dog By Using the Mental Instead of the Physical Leash” the mental leash is to help you keep your dog in your control. The physical leash doesn’t keep your dog in control – oh, his dog just interrupted the recording, and now Chuck is telling a story of a dalmatian who charged at him and his five dogs. Oh, and his dog London, got bit by a Chihuahua.

 The B-Side opens with Step 5: “Never Ask Your Dog to Perform a Task Which He Mentally Understands but Physically Cannot Accomplish” the dogs are only able to do what they can physically accomplish, oh, and Mike Douglas shoved a pickle too far in Chuck’s dog, Hobo’s mouth once. Step 6: “Learn to Compliment and Reward Properly” – don’t give dogs worthless compliments, you can give humans them, but not dogs. The compliments have to mean something. Only use food as a compliment when all other means have failed. Step 7: “Do Not Use Single Word Commands. They Limit a Dog’s Potential” – dogs have the ability to accomplish more than people would think. A dog who only hears one word commands will never think. It’s best to use words like “please” when using commands with your dogs, talk to the dog like they are humans. (Well, I already do that.) Step 8: “Learn the Danger of a Dog’s Physical and Mental Reflexes” – most dog bites don’t come from the immediate situation, but from a seed planted in the dog by the owner – it is easier to spot a human who has a grudge, unlike a dog. A dog’s hate will embed itself in the dogs mind. Step 9: “Use the Five Fundamental Sounds in Conjunction with the Things Your Dog has Been Trained to Do” – the five steps are the five things that can take your dog from a no nothing state to a genius of a dog. Call your dog to what you want him to do, not push, pull or force him there. Step 10: “Make Common Sense Your Final Guide” all dogs should be able to learn the same things, within their physical capabilities – drapes can get animal scents on them, and then dogs will go where there is the scent. This is weird. Then the “Summary” this album isn’t designed to teach your dog tricks, but to educate him.

Interesting Facts:
None.

Track Listing:
A1 – Preface
A2 – Learn to Observe Your Dog as He Observes You. Never Overlook a Single Glance or Movement
A3 – Always Be Positive When Judging the Reasons for Your Dog’s Actions
A4 – Learn How to Use Mental Instead of Physical Approaches to Both Training and Punishing Your Dog
A5 – Gain Control of Your Dog By Using the Mental Instead of the Physical Leash

B1 – Never Ask Your Dog to Perform a Task Which He Mentally Understands but Physically Cannot Accomplish
B2 – Learn to Compliment and Reward Properly
B3 – Do Not Use Single Word Commands. They Limit a Dog’s Potential
B4 – Learn the Danger of a Dog’s Physical and Mental Reflexes
B5 – Use the Five Fundamental Sounds in Conjunction with the Things Your Dog has Been Trained to Do
B6 – Make Common Sense Your Final Guide
B7 – Summary

Label:
Sight & Sound Enterprises

Catalog Number:
None.

Studio Musicians & Other Album Credits:
Produced by Jerry Johnson
Audio Engineer – Bill Ezell

Other Albums I Own by Charles P. Eisenmann:
None.

Released:
1975

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